Marvel’s first deaf superhero shines, but “Eternals” has an accessibility problem

Lauren Ridloff as Makkari is a scene-stealer. Too bad Disney hasn’t allowed certain audiences to watch her

Chloé Zhao’s “Eternals” has made history in a number of exciting ways, from being the first MCU movie with a (PG-13) sex scene, to featuring the MCU’s first openly gay superhero and his family. In addition, the movie includes the first onscreen deaf superhero, Makkari, who’s played on-screen by deaf actress Lauren Ridloff to great fan and critical acclaim.

“Eternals” follows 10 immortal beings with supernatural powers who’ve defended Earth from creatures known as Deviants for over 7,000 years. After centuries apart, the Eternals come together again to fight off a new threat that could spell the destruction of humanity.

Makkari is one of the Eternals who emerges as a witty, fiercely independent new hero with a mischievous spirit, and who has something of a budding romance going on with Barry Keoghan’s charming fellow Eternal, Druig (Barry Keoghan). Like Ridloff, Makkari also happens to be deaf – a characteristic that developed later in the comic books after Makkari also changed from male to female. Each Eternal has at least one special power, and Makkari wields the power of superspeed, which fortunately isn’t connected to her deafness, a common trope we sometimes see in TV and movies featuring characters with disabilities.

Even in well-meaning portrayals, we’ve often seen characters with disabilities dehumanized by stories that transform their disability into a superpower of sorts, making them otherworldly beings when they’re just ordinary people. In “Eternals,” Makkari’s deafness is just one of her many pieces and qualities, which we can’t wait to see further developed in a possible sequel or future appearances in the MCU.

Zhao has also spoken up about what Ridloff taught her about deaf gain, or in Zhao’s words, “the idea [that] there’s something that she is capable of doing and experiencing with the world that I don’t have a chance to experience. And that’s something so beautiful.” Deaf people and deaf characters like Makkari aren’t tragic sob stories, and have different, sometimes more advantageous, experiences from hearing people.

From the romance between Makkari and Druig, to Ridloff’s off-screen advocacy for the deaf community, representation for deaf and hard-of-hearing folks in Marvel’s “Eternals” brings fans plenty to be excited about. But Marvel Studios’ rollout of “Eternals” has ultimately let down the very people who are the most impacted by Makkari and Ridloff’s inclusion, because they can’t watch the performance in a theater, the only place the film is currently being released.

Fans have had to resort to crowdfunding to raise money for open-captioned viewing options for “Eternals,” among other accessible options. We know Marvel has the funds to provide all this and more, and considering inclusivity has been one of Marvel’s main selling points for “Eternals,” it owes inclusive options to audiences.

In the days leading up to the Nov. 5 premiere of “Eternals,” Gold House and CAPE’s One Open launched a GoFundMe page for private, open-captioned screenings of the movie as part of the groups’ community fund to support more and better representation of marginalized groups onscreen. The GoFundMe has raised thousands of dollars for deaf audiences and those with hearing struggles, but we should also be asking why the fundraiser was even needed. Marvel’s marketing for “Eternals” has focused so heavily on the movie’s first deaf MCU superhero — why isn’t Marvel doing everything it can to ensure any and all deaf audiences who want to see the movie can do so?

  1. The Atom Logo Svg

2. The Flash Man Svg

3. The Flash Man Svg

4. The Flash Svg

5. The King Of Wakanda Forever Chadwick Boseman Svg

6. The Superhero Cafe Svg

7. The Wifi Is Down Svg

8. Thor Logo Svg

9. Thor Logo Svg

10. Avengers Thor Svg

Lauren Ridloff as Makkari is a scene-stealer. Too bad Disney hasn’t allowed certain audiences to watch her Chloé Zhao’s “Eternals” has made history in a number of exciting ways, from being the first MCU movie with a (PG-13) sex scene, to featuring the MCU’s first openly gay superhero and his family. In addition, the movie…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *